And yet you leave out the most important part: The term "privilege" is muddied by its ambiguity, as it can refer to both *actual privielege* (i.e. receiving unearned benefits beyond what a person would otherwise be reasonably entitled to) and *unequal distribution/enforcement of basic inalienable rights.*

Being able to vote is not a privilege, it's a right.

Being able to freely travel in public without being harassed is not a privilege, it's a right.

Being able to call 911 without fear of being arrested or shot is not a privilege, it's a right.

So much of what we call "white privilege" is less a case of white people receiving above-average treatment than it is a case of blacks receiving below-average treatment.

And this is important, because when we start framing these issues in terms of "privilege" and not "rights," we subconsciously and collectively contribute to the ever-lowering degredation of what we expect from both society and ourselves.

--

So there's this thing called privacy

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